RCMP admits to cellphone spying

INDEPENDENT MEDIA by David Christopher Finally. After years of obfuscation, the RCMP has admitted they are using invasive surveillance devices known as IMSI-catchers or Stingrays … Read more

Internet surveillance

Is your data ending up in NSA’s hands? INDEPENDENT MEDIA by David Christopher How many websites have you visited today? How many emails have you … Read more

Canada and mass surveillance

Trump’s election should prompt Canada to rethink its complicity in US spy activities INDEPENDENT MEDIA by David Christopher President-elect Donald Trump. It’s still a phrase … Read more

ISP tax would make internet even more expensive for Canadians

photo of David Christopher

INDEPENDENT MEDIA
by David Christopher

At OpenMedia, we cover a wide range of digital rights issues so we’ve really seen the good, the bad and the ugly when it comes to policy proposals over the years. And this one’s a doozy: Canadian Heritage Minister Mélanie Joly is considering adding a new ISP tax to the monthly bills of Canada’s Internet subscribers.

This new tax will make Internet access even more expensive, despite the fact Canadians already pay among the highest prices in the industrialized world for this basic necessity. Fees are already so high that 44 percent of low-income households do not have a home Internet connection, leaving vast numbers of Canadians excluded from our digital endowment.

The ISP tax is the brainchild of Canada’s large publishers and broadcasters who have been using government consultations to ascertain how to fund Canadian content to push their plan. In a nutshell, they want to burden Canadian Internet users with an ISP tax in order to subsidize industries struggling to adapt to the digital age.

Read moreISP tax would make internet even more expensive for Canadians

Public consultation is a real chance to repeal unpopular legislation

photo of David Christopher

INDEPENDENT MEDIA
by David Christopher

It’s here. Almost a year into their mandate, the Liberal government has finally launched its long awaited public consultation on Bill C-51, and a broad range of privacy and national security issues.

Speaking at the launch, Public Safety Minister Ralph Goodale and Justice Minister Jody Wilson-Raybould said they had already identified a limited number of areas of Bill C-51 they wanted changed and that they wanted to get Canadians’ views on how to deal with the rest of the unpopular legislation.

Bill C-51, readers may recall, is the highly controversial spying bill forced through Parliament by the previous Conservative federal government. Notably, the legislation turns the Canadian Security and Intelligence Service (CSIS) into what the Globe and Mail has called a “secret police force,” with little independent oversight or accountability.

Read morePublic consultation is a real chance to repeal unpopular legislation