Seeds – the future of food

ON THE GARDEN PATH by Carolyn Herriot

Since the dawn of agriculture, edible plants that thrive in the bioregion in which they grow have been domesticated through plant breeding. Traditionally, local farmers were the stewards of these seeds, passing them on from harvest to harvest. Knowledge garnered over 10,000 years meant farmers were well qualified to select seeds of plants with the most desirable traits, such as high yield, drought tolerance and disease resistance. These “landrace” varieties were passed on from one generation to the next. At the dawn of the 21st century, the situation looks radically different.

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Medical scan scam

DRUG BUST Alan Cassels

Seek and ye shall find. We can find disease wherever we look; the question is do we need to be looking? One of the longest-running debates in health care circles involves the dichotomy of “prevention” versus “treatment.” Some people complain that our “health” system has nothing to do with health and basically exists to patch you up once you’re broken. It’s a system that, by design, ignores many of the factors that make us sick in the first place. Many people praise the need for prevention using very compelling arguments, stressing that the bucks need to go towards health promotion and disease prevention in order to save further billions on medical services down the road. This would avoid much needless suffering and engender a healthier, happier society at a fraction of the cost we currently incur.

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